╚═Ď┼╦đ╬Đ > ╣2, 2014 > Sovereignty, Diplomacy and Democracy: The Changing Character of źInternational Representation╗ Ś from State to Self

Alan K.Henrikson
Sovereignty, Diplomacy and Democracy: The Changing Character of źInternational Representation╗ Ś from State to Self


13 Ýţ ß­  2014

A “nation,” as distinct from a state, is a composite entity. It has unity, but also multiplicity. Can diplomacy, traditionally understood as the process by which sovereign states deal with each other, accommodate the participation of masses— a nation’s people themselves? An essential element and characteristic of diplomacy is its representativeness, which philosophically is a very complicated problem. It is not easy to explain how a person, or thing, can “stand for” someone, or something, else—or to know what, exactly, the entity being re-presented (made “present again”) is. In diplomacy, representation, though a concept rarely analyzed, is fundamental. As Paul Sharp, an especially thoughtful academic student of the subject has stated, diplomacy “is built upon the notion of representation.”


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